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The glibc vulnerability, CVE-2015-0235, known as “GHOST”, has been patched on CoreOS. If automatic updates are enabled (default configuration), your server should already be patched.

If automatic updates are disabled, you can force an update by running update_engine_client -check_for_update.

This week both rkt and the App Container (appc) spec have reached 0.2.0. Since our launch of the projects in December, both have been moving very quickly with a healthy community emerging. rkt now has cryptographic signing by default and a community is emerging around independent implementations of the appc spec. Read on for details on the updates.

CoreOS CTO Brandon Philips speaking at Linux Conf AU
January has been packed with meetups and events across the globe.

Today we round up our newest features and shine a spotlight on them. Since joining the CoreOS team, we have been working hard on features to improve the Quay.io experience. Highlights include squashed images (an experimental feature) for faster downloading, added build features for more control with build automation tools, and improved notification features for better communications within teams.

etcd 2.0

We are pleased to announce the first release candidate

Last week we announced an initial version of the "App Container Spec", a proposed standard for building and running application containers, along with a prototype implementation called Rocket.

Update: 494.3.0 wasn't correctly applying this shim, we've addressed this in 494.4.0 which is rolling out now.

This morning we started rolling out 494.4.0 to the stable channel. Among other things, this version updates Docker to 1.3.2, following in the footsteps of our releases to the alpha and beta channels last week.

Today Docker released Docker 1.3.2, immediately after which we began automatically rolling out an OS update. We were able to work with Docker to ensure that the CoreOS update could ship as soon as the Docker patch was released to the public. At the time of this writing, a significant number of CoreOS instances have already been updated.

If you aren’t familiar with Kubernetes, it is a container cluster manager from Google that offers a unique workflow for managing containers across multiple machines. We have written about Kubernetes and CoreOS in a tutorial series (Part 1, Part 2) here for those wanting to learn more.

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