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Edit: This post has been updated to reflect the project name change from rudder to flannel

This is a guest post by Lucas Carlson, Head of CenturyLink Labs

Here at CenturyLink Labs, we help people learn how to adopt new technologies like Docker and CoreOS into their daily lives. This has given us a unique perspective on the Docker ecosystem because we are trying to stay on top of one of the fastest growing open-source projects in history.

After talking to tens of thousands of developers and ops people, we kept hearing the same thing over and over:

Update: We've updated a few aspects of our training program and the CoreOS Specialist certification is not offered at this time.

Today we are excited to bring you more opportunities to learn about CoreOS - both through the Linux Foundation’s Certification Program that was announced today and through in-person training courses.

Today we announced that Quay.io is now part of the CoreOS family. If you are not familiar with Quay.io, it is the first hosted private docker registry. In addition to continuing to invest in Quay.io, we are launching the CoreOS Enterprise Registry based on Quay.io. Enterprise Registry is a solution for companies that want to run their own docker registry.

 

Today we announced that Quay.io is now part of the CoreOS family. If you are not familiar with Quay.io, it is the first hosted private docker registry. In addition to continuing to invest in Quay.io, we are launching the CoreOS Enterprise Registry based on Quay.io. Enterprise Registry is a solution for companies that want to run their own docker registry.

Edit: The most up to date Kubernetes + CoreOS guide can be found on the Kubernetes GitHub project.

In the previous post I outlined how to set up a single node Kubernetes cluster manually. This was a great way to get started and try out the basic Kubernetes examples. Now its time to take it up a notch.

First off, Happy SysAdmin Day. We think we have a pretty good SysAdmin surprise in store for you today as we are announcing the CoreOS stable release channel. Starting today, you can begin running CoreOS in production. This version is the most tested, secure and reliable version available for users wanting to run CoreOS. This is a huge milestone for us. Since our first alpha release in August 2013:

Edit: The most up to date Kubernetes + CoreOS guide can be found on the Kubernetes GitHub project.

This post is not kept up to date with the latest developments! The latest documentation can be found at this GitHub repository: https://github.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/kubernetes/tree/master/docs/gett…

CoreOS has a rapidly incrementing version, 197.0.0, 247.0.0, and so on. It is a little known fact, but the version represents the number of days since the CoreOS epoch on July 1, 2013. And we hope to make 365.0.0 a particularly special release. Over the next week this release will go through our alpha and beta channels and, if all goes well, it will be the first version to be promoted to stable. So, watch along with us in the release channel to see if this is the one!

Earlier this morning at Structure, Rackspace announced OnMetal, their API-driven, single-tenant infrastructure-as-a-service offering. We are excited to announce that CoreOS will be available at launch!

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