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Organizations around the world have begun adopting container-oriented infrastructure in the past few years. The first step on the path to container enlightenment is packaging software in container images. Thinking of containers as black boxes is extremely useful for the consistent deployment of software. However, this abstraction is a double-edged sword: If the container is a black box, how do deployers know what’s in it?

Since the first enterprise technology systems became available, they have promised greater freedom, efficiency and productivity, yet each successive generation demanded considerable capital expenditure for proprietary software that made the option of changing vendors prohibitive. Despite the unquestionable promise of cloud computing, the landscape is beginning to look familiarly restrictive. Today at CoreOS Fest, we are showing how CoreOS Tectonic is focused on breaking this cycle of restriction, all via open source technologies.

CoreOS develops modern container cluster infrastructure guided by a philosophy of automation in pursuit of security. Beginning with the automatically-updating Container Linux operating system and extending through the Tectonic Kubernetes platform for the enterprise, CoreOS aims to deliver “continuous availability” – automated deployment, lifecycle management, and security updates at each layer of the infrastructure stack.

CoreOS Fest is coming up next week! We look forward to welcoming you to the Kubernetes and distributed systems community event on Wednesday, May 31 and Thursday, June 1. We’ll see how the container ecosystem has developed and what new work is being done in the world of distributed systems. We’re anticipating insightful conversations on how to build, run, and secure your infrastructure with open source projects like Container Linux, etcd, Kubernetes, and more!

Prometheus is a monitoring system and time series database expressly designed for the highly distributed, automated, and scalable modern cluster architectures orchestrated by systems like Kubernetes. Prometheus has an operational model and a query language tailored for distributed, dynamic environments.

CoreOS Fest, the distributed systems, containers and Kubernetes conference, is coming up on May 31 and June 1 in San Francisco. This two-day event is the only 2017 West Coast conference for those in the Kubernetes community (new and seasoned alike) to come together and share stories, and we want to make sure you are all planning to be there. Last year, the event was in Berlin, and for its third year CoreOS is bringing the conference back to San Francisco.

Distributed systems commonly rely on a distributed consensus to coordinate work. Usually the systems providing distributed consensus guarantee information is delivered in order and never suffer split-brain conflicts.

It is a great honor for me to welcome Mitchell Baker, executive chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation, to the CoreOS board of directors. She’s one of the most influential people in open source software, advocating for a safer and better internet through open source projects and internet standards.

Kubectl is a familiar tool if you use Kubernetes, and it has a broad functionality that takes time to master; it can be a more powerful tool than many people expect. Great resources exist for working with the kubectl command line interface. This is a collection of tips and tricks that will allow you to expand your ability to work with kubectl. Be sure to take a look at the cheat sheet in the kubernetes.io docs section as well!

At the end of March we saw Kubernetes 1.6, the first release led by a non-Google employee (CoreOS’ own Dan Gillespie), released in upstream. Today we announce the release of CoreOS Tectonic 1.6.2.

The primary focus of this release, in addition to delivering the most current, upstream version of Kubernetes to Tectonic users, is to turn on a number of features that deliver enterprise Kubernetes.

The major updates that make up Tectonic 1.6.2 include:

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