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It is a great honor for me to welcome Mitchell Baker, executive chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation, to the CoreOS board of directors. She’s one of the most influential people in open source software, advocating for a safer and better internet through open source projects and internet standards.

Kubectl is a familiar tool if you use Kubernetes, and it has a broad functionality that takes time to master; it can be a more powerful tool than many people expect. Great resources exist for working with the kubectl command line interface. This is a collection of tips and tricks that will allow you to expand your ability to work with kubectl. Be sure to take a look at the cheat sheet in the kubernetes.io docs section as well!

At the end of March we saw Kubernetes 1.6, the first release led by a non-Google employee (CoreOS’ own Dan Gillespie), released in upstream. Today we announce the release of CoreOS Tectonic 1.6.2.

The primary focus of this release, in addition to delivering the most current, upstream version of Kubernetes to Tectonic users, is to turn on a number of features that deliver enterprise Kubernetes.

The major updates that make up Tectonic 1.6.2 include:

While Kubernetes is ushering in a world where SSH is less necessary on a daily basis for deploying and managing applications, there are still instances when SSH is necessary for gathering statistics, debugging issues, and repairing configuration issues. So, while years from now there may not be a need to SSH and run one-off debugging sessions, the tools below are useful for quickly SSH'ing into machines in your Kubernetes cluster.

Bringing AWS Application Load Balancer support to Kubernetes with Ticketmaster

Teams running Kubernetes have long desired more than the "out of the box" cloud provider integration for load balancers. This is especially true on AWS, where provisioning a Classic Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) per service might not cut it (financially and functionally).

 

Locksmith is the component included in CoreOS Container Linux that manages machine reboots after an update has been downloaded. This is a critical part of the operating system that we’ve had in place since the launch of our distribution, and today is part of the reason why when a security vulnerability is released we can update every auto-updating Container Linux machine on the order of hours.

Locksmith has four update strategies:

This week, CoreOS released Matchbox v0.6.0 with new Terraform integrations, which enables you to create and share resources within teams for reproducible production infrastructure.

May is a busy month for us here at CoreOS. With conferences around the country, and our own CoreOS Fest coming up, there’s no shortage of places to meet our team. We hope you’re all as excited as we are to meet the community in San Francisco on May 31 and June 1!

User experience design has a significant impact on how smooth your development process is. You shouldn’t have to struggle to work with your registry and orchestration systems; they should complement each other in a way that improves a user’s experience for both. As Kubernetes has exploded in popularity and more people use orchestration, there has been a shift in how users interact with their registries. The Quay team at CoreOS continues to make improvements to the quality of life of those implementing modern best practices for containerized deployments.

It’s easy to forget how new Kubernetes and containers are. Those of us who’ve already embraced them should remember we’re on the frontier. If you’re a regular reader of the CoreOS blog, you’re likely with us on that bleeding edge.

This post will be a little different than our usual. Its goal is to introduce Kubernetes to folks who aren’t on the frontier. That might be those in tech who work on the business side, or developers who have yet to make the leap into containers. To tell the tale, we’ll get a little help from everyone’s favorite frozen treat—ice cream.

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