Skip to main content

May is a busy month for us here at CoreOS. With conferences around the country, and our own CoreOS Fest coming up, there’s no shortage of places to meet our team. We hope you’re all as excited as we are to meet the community in San Francisco on May 31 and June 1!

User experience design has a significant impact on how smooth your development process is. You shouldn’t have to struggle to work with your registry and orchestration systems; they should complement each other in a way that improves a user’s experience for both. As Kubernetes has exploded in popularity and more people use orchestration, there has been a shift in how users interact with their registries. The Quay team at CoreOS continues to make improvements to the quality of life of those implementing modern best practices for containerized deployments.

It’s easy to forget how new Kubernetes and containers are. Those of us who’ve already embraced them should remember we’re on the frontier. If you’re a regular reader of the CoreOS blog, you’re likely with us on that bleeding edge.

This post will be a little different than our usual. Its goal is to introduce Kubernetes to folks who aren’t on the frontier. That might be those in tech who work on the business side, or developers who have yet to make the leap into containers. To tell the tale, we’ll get a little help from everyone’s favorite frozen treat—ice cream.

We’re talking about the container ecosystem in April; join us to hear about Kubernetes, Operators, and more. We’ll see you at DockerCon, QCon, and community meetups!

CoreOS Fest 2017

 

We can’t believe that it’s less than 60 days until CoreOS Fest! This will be our third community conference, and each year the conference only gets better, with more interesting talks, exciting announcements, valuable conversations, and of course, vibrant parties.

Last November at CloudNativeCon, we introduced the Operators pattern. It’s a way to extend Kubernetes’ self-healing features to the complex world of stateful apps.

Today rkt launched in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). It is a big day for the future of rkt, the pod-native container engine, and container execution in general, as it is now housed in a neutral and collaborative home, alongside containerd, also launched in CNCF today.

Kubernetes 1.6 has just been released, and I am incredibly proud to have served as its release lead. Thank you to Caleb Miles (CoreOS) and the rest of my team members from Microsoft, Red Hat, Heptio, Mirantis and Google for all of your hard work and support, as well as the hundreds of community members that participated in this release.

Today, we are thrilled to announce the latest release of CoreOS Tectonic, which includes the ability to deploy highly available Kubernetes 1.5.5 clusters in existing infrastructure for AWS and bare-metal environments. Along with this release, we are including preview availability for running Tectonic on Microsoft Azure and OpenStack. The additional platforms provide flexibility and choice to enterprises looking to easily use Kubernetes, setting them on a path for success with cloud native technologies.

When we started Quay, we wanted to build an image registry that not only allowed you to manage your container images, but do so securely and reliably. Over the past few months we have noticed an accelerated interest in Quay and containers in general. One of the main forces driving this growth is the adoption of container orchestration and in particular, Kubernetes. And with the introduction of a new platform came a new set of challenges around deploying ever increasingly complex applications.

Subscribe to CoreOS Blog