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Today rkt launched in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). It is a big day for the future of rkt, the pod-native container engine, and container execution in general, as it is now housed in a neutral and collaborative home, alongside containerd, also launched in CNCF today.

Kubernetes 1.6 has just been released, and I am incredibly proud to have served as its release lead. Thank you to Caleb Miles (CoreOS) and the rest of my team members from Microsoft, Red Hat, Heptio, Mirantis and Google for all of your hard work and support, as well as the hundreds of community members that participated in this release.

Today, we are thrilled to announce the latest release of CoreOS Tectonic, which includes the ability to deploy highly available Kubernetes 1.5.5 clusters in existing infrastructure for AWS and bare-metal environments. Along with this release, we are including preview availability for running Tectonic on Microsoft Azure and OpenStack. The additional platforms provide flexibility and choice to enterprises looking to easily use Kubernetes, setting them on a path for success with cloud native technologies.

When we started Quay, we wanted to build an image registry that not only allowed you to manage your container images, but do so securely and reliably. Over the past few months we have noticed an accelerated interest in Quay and containers in general. One of the main forces driving this growth is the adoption of container orchestration and in particular, Kubernetes. And with the introduction of a new platform came a new set of challenges around deploying ever increasingly complex applications.

An admission plugin security vulnerability related to PodSecurityPolicies was patched with the release of Kubernetes v1.5.5. This vulnerability could allow users to make use of any PodSecurityPolicies object, including those they are not authorized to use.

Am I affected by this vulnerability?

This vulnerability only affects Kubernetes v1.5.0-1.5.4 and, more specifically, installations that do all of the following:

In 2014 Google packaged their experience building massive and automated container clusters into a remarkable system of open source software known by a Greek word for “helmsman”: Kubernetes. Successor to the internal Borg system and its research-oriented successor, Omega, the introduction of Kubernetes garnered massive interest. The open source project quickly took on new developers outside Google.

Today CoreOS and Docker made a combined proposal to add rkt and containerd as new projects for inclusion in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). During today's CNCF Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) meeting, Jonathan Boulle, a rkt project lead and co-founder, proposed rkt, and Michael Crosby, a containerd project lead and co-founder, proposed containerd.

Every year, we love getting the CoreOS community together to celebrate distributed systems, Kubernetes and CoreOS technologies at CoreOS Fest. This year, CoreOS Fest gathers the community on May 31 and June 1 at Pier 27 in San Francisco. In addition to keynotes and announcements from Alex Polvi, CEO of CoreOS, and Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, we have an intriguing lineup of speakers that will bring timely topics to light.

KubeCon and Cloud Native Con Europe is coming up this month and we hope to see you there! Meet us in March at the following events:

CoreOS Fest San Francisco, coming up May 31 and June 1, is rapidly approaching, which means it’s time to get those speaking proposals in! To help you in your proposal writing process, here’s a quick guide.

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