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Every year, we love getting the CoreOS community together to celebrate distributed systems, Kubernetes and CoreOS technologies at CoreOS Fest. This year, CoreOS Fest gathers the community on May 31 and June 1 at Pier 27 in San Francisco. In addition to keynotes and announcements from Alex Polvi, CEO of CoreOS, and Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, we have an intriguing lineup of speakers that will bring timely topics to light.

KubeCon and Cloud Native Con Europe is coming up this month and we hope to see you there! Meet us in March at the following events:

CoreOS Fest San Francisco, coming up May 31 and June 1, is rapidly approaching, which means it’s time to get those speaking proposals in! To help you in your proposal writing process, here’s a quick guide.

The 2017 Open Source Leadership Summit, put on by the Linux Foundation, brought together leaders from the open source community in Lake Tahoe last week to discuss timely open source topics. The topics that came up most throughout the conference included: open source becoming mainstream, future open source business models, security in a time where everything is connected, and a call to action to be active in technology policy.

The Double-Free vulnerability in the Linux kernel, as reported in CVE-2017-6074, has been patched in CoreOS Container Linux. This vulnerability could allow a local user to escalate to root privileges.

If you’ve ever heard someone from CoreOS speak on stage, you’ve probably heard them say something similar to, “Our plan is to dramatically improve the security of the internet.” That is the mission our founders set for the company when starting CoreOS.

This blog post is the first in a series exploring the performance of three distributed, consistent key-value stores: etcd, Zookeeper, and Consul. The post is written by the etcd team.

Over the past two years, we’ve seen a shift in the way organizations think about and manage distributed applications. At CoreOS, work toward this shift began with fleet, a simple distributed service manager released in 2014. Today, the community is seeing widespread adoption of Kubernetes, a system with origins at Google that is becoming the de facto standard for open source container orchestration.

This past December, we held Tectonic Summit, the premier enterprise Kubernetes conference. It was a successful, sold-out showcase of self-driving infrastructure.

The Kubernetes community released its 1.5 version on December 12 and just about a business month later (which included the holiday season), we are proud to release Tectonic 1.5. Tectonic includes self-driving container infrastructure and ships with the latest Kubernetes version, 1.5.2.

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