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All posts tagged “announcements”
Kubernetes 1.10 is here

 

Kubernetes, a leading open source project for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, announced version 1.10 today. Among the key features of this release are support for the Container Storage Interface (CSI), API aggregation, a new mechanism for supporting hardware devices, and more.

It's also the first release since CoreOS joined Red Hat. CoreOS already had the opportunity to work closely with our new Red Hat colleagues through the Kubernetes community and we now have the opportunity to redouble our efforts to help forward Kubernetes as an open source and community-first project.

Today we are issuing patches for two newly disclosed security vulnerabilities affecting all versions of Tectonic and Kubernetes versions 1.3 through 1.10. The vulnerabilities have been assigned CVE-2017-1002101 and CVE-2017-1002102, respectively.

Red Hat and CoreOS logos

 

CoreOS has agreed to become a part of the Red Hat family.

Red Hat and CoreOS’s relationship began many years ago as open source collaborators developing some of the key innovations in containers and distributed systems, making automated operations a reality. Since that time, we have both become leaders in the communities that are driving these innovations, including Kubernetes, the Open Container Initiative (OCI) and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Today Red Hat announced it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire CoreOS. By joining Red Hat, I believe we will make these important technologies ubiquitous in business and the world.

New releases of Container Linux addressing the Meltdown attack, caused by vulnerabilities in many modern processors, are now available in all three Container Linux release channels: Alpha 1649.0.0, Beta 1632.1.0, and Stable 1576.5.0. Updates are rolling out to the Alpha and Beta channels now, and should complete over the next 24-48 hours. By default, Container Linux will apply these updates automatically, but systems with non-default configurations should be manually updated as soon as possible.

A recent information disclosure vulnerability (CVE-2018-5256) was found and addressed in Tectonic, which affects versions 1.7 through 1.8. Unauthenticated users were able to list all Namespaces through the Console. In 1.8, which finalized the transition from Third Party Resources (TPRs) to Custom Resource Definitions (CRDs), the ability to list all CRDs was affected by the same bug. The intention of this API endpoint is to enable listing all namespaces by logged-in users.

Tectonic 1.8 logo image

Today we're proud to announce Tectonic 1.8, the latest release of our enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, is now available. This version, which we announced ahead of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America earlier this month, is the first to ship with a catalog of industry-first Open Cloud Services that enable users to deploy key infrastructure components with the ease of managed cloud vendor offerings but without cloud vendor lock-in.

Tectonic 1.8 logo image

 

Today we're happy to announce that Tectonic 1.8, the forthcoming release of our world-class enterprise Kubernetes platform, will ship with a catalog of industry-first Open Cloud Services. Open Cloud Services enable enterprises to deploy key infrastructure components with the ease and efficiency they've come to expect from public cloud providers, while avoiding cloud provider lock-in.

CoreOS Tectonic is Certified Kubernetes

 

Today CoreOS is pleased to announce that CoreOS Tectonic, our enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, has passed the software conformance tests administered by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to become one of the first fully Certified Kubernetes offerings on the market.

Kubernetes makes management of complex environments easy, but to ensure availability it's crucial to have operational insight into the Kubernetes components and all applications running on the cluster. At CoreOS, we believe monitoring is the backbone of a good production environment, which is why we are investing in development of the Prometheus monitoring system. A project hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Prometheus has rapidly gained popularity for infrastructure and application monitoring alike, and today it's taking its next step forward.

Tectonic 1.7.5 has arrived, and this release is all about monitoring. Container-based infrastructure is highly dynamic, which is great for agility, but enterprise-ready Kubernetes means having the right tools in place to monitor your clusters and respond quickly when problems arise. That's what Tectonic delivers.

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