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All posts tagged “community”

At CoreOS, we recognized early on that Kubernetes would become the go-to technology for managing containerized infrastructure in production. The project's openness has allowed it to be embraced by a veritable who's-who of technology vendors, integrators, and consumers. In fact, Kubernetes is now one of the fastest-growing projects in the history of open source. Yet while it may be tempting to assume that getting up and running with Kubernetes is as simple as downloading the code and deploying a cluster, the truth is that going this route can be easier said than done.

The container ecosystem is constantly shifting. Open source tools spring up, new startups enter, and major releases of foundational projects introduce new technologies and concepts. Every month there seems to be a new acronym, and to anyone not deeply involved in the ecosystem it can be overwhelming to keep track of how even the most basic of container concepts relate to each other. So we’ve created a document to help others better understand how the major standards and components in the container ecosystem fit together.

Today, along with the rest of the Kubernetes community, we’re cheering the release of Kubernetes 1.8. The momentum within the community continues to grow as organizations embrace Kubernetes as the leading platform for container orchestration, and this release continues the Kubernetes community's commitment to security and extensibility with work on stabilizing existing features, even as new ones are added.

Kubernetes turns two this month, and there is so much to celebrate! Kubernetes is meeting the critical business needs of some of the world’s largest organizations, and the rate of adoption over the last year has affirmed CoreOS’s commitment to this groundbreaking project. As the creators of the Tectonic enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution, CoreOS knows none of this would be possible without the upstream community. We’re proud to see the ranks of the Kubernetes community swell by so many talented and passionate people who help drive the project forward.

In 2014 Google packaged their experience building massive and automated container clusters into a remarkable system of open source software known by a Greek word for “helmsman”: Kubernetes. Successor to the internal Borg system and its research-oriented successor, Omega, the introduction of Kubernetes garnered massive interest. The open source project quickly took on new developers outside Google.

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