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All posts tagged “Kubernetes”

Kubernetes turns two this month, and there is so much to celebrate! Kubernetes is meeting the critical business needs of some of the world’s largest organizations, and the rate of adoption over the last year has affirmed CoreOS’s commitment to this groundbreaking project. As the creators of the Tectonic enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution, CoreOS knows none of this would be possible without the upstream community. We’re proud to see the ranks of the Kubernetes community swell by so many talented and passionate people who help drive the project forward.

CoreOS is celebrating its fourth birthday this month. Join us in a look back at the past four years and at where we are heading, and celebrate with us!

CoreOS was born in 2013

Alex Polvi and Brandon Philips co-founded CoreOS with the fundamental idea of securing the backend of the internet via automated operations. Remember this scrappy company born out of a garage in Palo Alto?

Linux Hackers Rebuild Internet From Silicon Valley Garage (via WIRED).

CoreOS released version 1.6.7 of the Tectonic enterprise ready Kubernetes platform today. This automatic update is immediately available for clusters running Tectonic 1.6.x, or downloadable with a free license for investigating new deployments.

Kubernetes, the open source platform for managing containers at scale, is releasing version 1.7 this week. Over 375 different individuals had a hand stabilizing and adding new features to this version, and we would like to thank all of them for their effort, and celebrate our team members that also contributed to this release. Version 1.7 brings in a new set of features, plus it continues the construction of new interfaces to make Kubernetes more extensible with a more reliable core.

A new API object type called a Custom Resource Definition (CRD) will replace the existing Third Party Resource (TPR) extension mechanism over the next two Kubernetes releases. In the upcoming Kubernetes version 1.7, CRDs are introduced into the beta API namespace for features designated for official support. By version 1.8, CRDs will be the supported mechanism and TPRs will be entirely deprecated.

Recently, we released a study conducted by technology research and advisory company 451 Research investigating containers adoption by enterprises across a range of industries. The study included responses from over 200 enterprise IT decision makers, mostly from large enterprises within the US, including CTO’s, VP’s, and directors of IT, IT Ops and DevOps.

kubectl enables system administrators to interact with Kubernetes using a well-designed command-line interface. The common interactions include running services, grabbing pod logs, or identifying nodes inside of a cluster. For most Kubernetes users, these interactions are second nature.

CoreOS builds open source software. Why build with open source? Because the problem to be solved is massive, and innovation is needed at the macro level. It is estimated:

Since the first enterprise technology systems became available, they have promised greater freedom, efficiency and productivity, yet each successive generation demanded considerable capital expenditure for proprietary software that made the option of changing vendors prohibitive. Despite the unquestionable promise of cloud computing, the landscape is beginning to look familiarly restrictive. Today at CoreOS Fest, we are showing how CoreOS Tectonic is focused on breaking this cycle of restriction, all via open source technologies.

Prometheus is a monitoring system and time series database expressly designed for the highly distributed, automated, and scalable modern cluster architectures orchestrated by systems like Kubernetes. Prometheus has an operational model and a query language tailored for distributed, dynamic environments.

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