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CoreOS was founded with the mission of securing the internet, and containerized infrastructure is a big part of how we’re achieving that aim. That’s why we were gratified to see the new guidance on application container security issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In many ways, the report affirms the core principles upon which CoreOS was founded.

CoreOS Tectonic is Certified Kubernetes

 

Today CoreOS is pleased to announce that CoreOS Tectonic, our enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, has passed the software conformance tests administered by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to become one of the first fully Certified Kubernetes offerings on the market.

In September, I joined the CoreOS team on its first trip to the Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC), organized in Orlando by AnitaB.org (formerly the Anita Borg Institute). At 18,000 attendees from 90+ countries, GHC is the world’s largest gathering of women in computing. The conference features tech talks, career guidance panels, networking events, various competitions, and a career fair.

CoreOS + Kubernetes

 

Join CoreOS in rounding out 2017 at ContainerConf, AWS re:Invent, KubeCon, and more! We have plenty to share about distributed systems and Kubernetes, so meet with us to hear about the latest developments in the community.

Kubernetes makes management of complex environments easy, but to ensure availability it's crucial to have operational insight into the Kubernetes components and all applications running on the cluster. At CoreOS, we believe monitoring is the backbone of a good production environment, which is why we are investing in development of the Prometheus monitoring system. A project hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Prometheus has rapidly gained popularity for infrastructure and application monitoring alike, and today it's taking its next step forward.

At CoreOS, we recognized early on that Kubernetes would become the go-to technology for managing containerized infrastructure in production. The project's openness has allowed it to be embraced by a veritable who's-who of technology vendors, integrators, and consumers. In fact, Kubernetes is now one of the fastest-growing projects in the history of open source. Yet while it may be tempting to assume that getting up and running with Kubernetes is as simple as downloading the code and deploying a cluster, the truth is that going this route can be easier said than done.

As a modern, minimal, container-focused operating system, Container Linux by CoreOS strives to deliver the most recent stable versions of the key software needed to run containers: the Docker and rkt container engines, the Linux kernel, systemd, and

The container ecosystem is constantly shifting. Open source tools spring up, new startups enter, and major releases of foundational projects introduce new technologies and concepts. Every month there seems to be a new acronym, and to anyone not deeply involved in the ecosystem it can be overwhelming to keep track of how even the most basic of container concepts relate to each other. So we’ve created a document to help others better understand how the major standards and components in the container ecosystem fit together.

Pluggability is part of the success story of Kubernetes, and as a community we have ensured that many layers – including storage, networking, and schedulers – can be replaced and improved without changing the Kubernetes user experience. Earlier this year, the Kubernetes project created an API called the Container Runtime Interface (CRI) to make the way a container is run on Kubernetes pluggable.

Tectonic 1.7.5 has arrived, and this release is all about monitoring. Container-based infrastructure is highly dynamic, which is great for agility, but enterprise-ready Kubernetes means having the right tools in place to monitor your clusters and respond quickly when problems arise. That's what Tectonic delivers.

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