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A new API object type called a Custom Resource Definition (CRD) will replace the existing Third Party Resource (TPR) extension mechanism over the next two Kubernetes releases. In the upcoming Kubernetes version 1.7, CRDs are introduced into the beta API namespace for features designated for official support. By version 1.8, CRDs will be the supported mechanism and TPRs will be entirely deprecated.

Background on the Stack Clash

Security researchers at Qualys recently disclosed new techniques to exploit stack allocations on several operating systems, even in the face of a number of security measures. Qualys was able to find numerous local-root exploits — exploits which allow local users of a system to gain root privileges — by applying stack allocation techniques against various pieces of userspace software.

Recently, we released a study conducted by technology research and advisory company 451 Research investigating containers adoption by enterprises across a range of industries. The study included responses from over 200 enterprise IT decision makers, mostly from large enterprises within the US, including CTO’s, VP’s, and directors of IT, IT Ops and DevOps.

We started June with CoreOS Fest in full swing. If you missed any part of the show, check out the recorded talks.

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The etcd team is pleased to announce etcd 3.2.0, the latest feature release in the 3.x series. This edition has proxy improvements, boosted backend concurrency, distributed coordination services, a slimmer Go client, JWT authentication, and more.

kubectl enables system administrators to interact with Kubernetes using a well-designed command-line interface. The common interactions include running services, grabbing pod logs, or identifying nodes inside of a cluster. For most Kubernetes users, these interactions are second nature.

Organizations around the world have begun adopting container-oriented infrastructure in the past few years. The first step on the path to container enlightenment is packaging software in container images. Thinking of containers as black boxes is extremely useful for the consistent deployment of software. However, this abstraction is a double-edged sword: If the container is a black box, how do deployers know what’s in it?

CoreOS builds open source software. Why build with open source? Because the problem to be solved is massive, and innovation is needed at the macro level. It is estimated:

Since the first enterprise technology systems became available, they have promised greater freedom, efficiency and productivity, yet each successive generation demanded considerable capital expenditure for proprietary software that made the option of changing vendors prohibitive. Despite the unquestionable promise of cloud computing, the landscape is beginning to look familiarly restrictive. Today at CoreOS Fest, we are showing how CoreOS Tectonic is focused on breaking this cycle of restriction, all via open source technologies.

CoreOS develops modern container cluster infrastructure guided by a philosophy of automation in pursuit of security. Beginning with the automatically-updating Container Linux operating system and extending through the Tectonic Kubernetes platform for the enterprise, CoreOS aims to deliver “continuous availability” – automated deployment, lifecycle management, and security updates at each layer of the infrastructure stack.

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