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CoreOS released version 1.6.7 of the Tectonic enterprise ready Kubernetes platform today. This automatic update is immediately available for clusters running Tectonic 1.6.x, or downloadable with a free license for investigating new deployments.

This July, celebrate the CoreOS and Kubernetes birthdays with us and more. We hope to see you at GopherCon, and at the Los Angeles Kubernetes meetup. We’re also hosting a number of informative webinars throughout the month.

Kubernetes, the open source platform for managing containers at scale, is releasing version 1.7 this week. Over 375 different individuals had a hand stabilizing and adding new features to this version, and we would like to thank all of them for their effort, and celebrate our team members that also contributed to this release. Version 1.7 brings in a new set of features, plus it continues the construction of new interfaces to make Kubernetes more extensible with a more reliable core.

A new API object type called a Custom Resource Definition (CRD) will replace the existing Third Party Resource (TPR) extension mechanism over the next two Kubernetes releases. In the upcoming Kubernetes version 1.7, CRDs are introduced into the beta API namespace for features designated for official support. By version 1.8, CRDs will be the supported mechanism and TPRs will be entirely deprecated.

Background on the Stack Clash

Security researchers at Qualys recently disclosed new techniques to exploit stack allocations on several operating systems, even in the face of a number of security measures. Qualys was able to find numerous local-root exploits — exploits which allow local users of a system to gain root privileges — by applying stack allocation techniques against various pieces of userspace software.

Recently, we released a study conducted by technology research and advisory company 451 Research investigating containers adoption by enterprises across a range of industries. The study included responses from over 200 enterprise IT decision makers, mostly from large enterprises within the US, including CTO’s, VP’s, and directors of IT, IT Ops and DevOps.

We started June with CoreOS Fest in full swing. If you missed any part of the show, check out the recorded talks.

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The etcd team is pleased to announce etcd 3.2.0, the latest feature release in the 3.x series. This edition has proxy improvements, boosted backend concurrency, distributed coordination services, a slimmer Go client, JWT authentication, and more.

kubectl enables system administrators to interact with Kubernetes using a well-designed command-line interface. The common interactions include running services, grabbing pod logs, or identifying nodes inside of a cluster. For most Kubernetes users, these interactions are second nature.

CoreOS builds open source software. Why build with open source? Because the problem to be solved is massive, and innovation is needed at the macro level. It is estimated:

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