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At CoreOS, we recognized early on that Kubernetes would become the go-to technology for managing containerized infrastructure in production. The project's openness has allowed it to be embraced by a veritable who's-who of technology vendors, integrators, and consumers. In fact, Kubernetes is now one of the fastest-growing projects in the history of open source. Yet while it may be tempting to assume that getting up and running with Kubernetes is as simple as downloading the code and deploying a cluster, the truth is that going this route can be easier said than done.

As a modern, minimal, container-focused operating system, Container Linux by CoreOS strives to deliver the most recent stable versions of the key software needed to run containers: the Docker and rkt container engines, the Linux kernel, systemd, and

The container ecosystem is constantly shifting. Open source tools spring up, new startups enter, and major releases of foundational projects introduce new technologies and concepts. Every month there seems to be a new acronym, and to anyone not deeply involved in the ecosystem it can be overwhelming to keep track of how even the most basic of container concepts relate to each other. So we’ve created a document to help others better understand how the major standards and components in the container ecosystem fit together.

Pluggability is part of the success story of Kubernetes, and as a community we have ensured that many layers – including storage, networking, and schedulers – can be replaced and improved without changing the Kubernetes user experience. Earlier this year, the Kubernetes project created an API called the Container Runtime Interface (CRI) to make the way a container is run on Kubernetes pluggable.

Tectonic 1.7.5 has arrived, and this release is all about monitoring. Container-based infrastructure is highly dynamic, which is great for agility, but enterprise-ready Kubernetes means having the right tools in place to monitor your clusters and respond quickly when problems arise. That's what Tectonic delivers.

With the release of Kubernetes 1.8, role-based access control (RBAC) has been promoted from beta to general availability. CoreOS, through our participation in the Kubernetes SIG Auth group, played a significant role in getting RBAC implemented in upstream Kubernetes. With its graduation to general availability, the feature and its core APIs can be considered stable.

October is a big month to celebrate open source! Meet us at Grace Hopper Celebration, All Systems Go, All Things Open, and Open Source Summit EU to learn about container orchestration with Kubernetes, monitoring with Prometheus, and more.

 

Security researchers have recently discovered multiple remotely exploitable vulnerabilities affecting all users of Kubernetes 1.5.0 through 1.7.6. While the risk of an attacker successfully exploiting these flaws is relatively low, the vulnerabilities could potentially allow arbitrary code execution or DoS attacks and thus demand immediate attention. CoreOS Tectonic users can be assured, however, that patches are now available and can be applied with a single click or automatically, if configured.

Today, along with the rest of the Kubernetes community, we’re cheering the release of Kubernetes 1.8. The momentum within the community continues to grow as organizations embrace Kubernetes as the leading platform for container orchestration, and this release continues the Kubernetes community's commitment to security and extensibility with work on stabilizing existing features, even as new ones are added.

A reliable key-value store gives distributed systems a common substrate for consistent configuration and coordination. One such system is the etcd project, an open source key-value store created by CoreOS. It is the heart of many production distributed systems and is the data store for Kubernetes, among other projects.

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