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All posts tagged “announcements”

The Kubernetes community released its 1.5 version on December 12 and just about a business month later (which included the holiday season), we are proud to release Tectonic 1.5. Tectonic includes self-driving container infrastructure and ships with the latest Kubernetes version, 1.5.2.

A new year and a new milestone release of etcd. Hot on the heels of 17 bugfix releases to etcd 3.0, two alphas, and two release candidates, the etcd team is proud to announce etcd 3.1. This edition of etcd features performance, reliability, and API enhancements over the 3.0 series. It also introduces the first iteration of the etcd v3 gRPC proxy, a smart proxy for offloading client requests away from the core cluster.

CoreOS etcd’s first commits happened some three and a half years ago, and a lot has changed since that initial version 0 of the etcd API. etcd version 3, introduced last summer, offers a streamlined, gRPC-based API and dramatic performance improvements over both competitive solutions and its own prior versions, while maintaining the distributed reliability and rolling upgrade capabilities that make etcd manageable in production.

Docker just released docker 1.12.6 with a fix for a vulnerability in RunC (CVE-2016-9962). The security advisory states:

Intel's Clear Containers technology allows admins to benefit from the ease of container-based deployment without giving up the security of virtualization. For more than a year, rkt's KVM stage1 has supported VM-based container isolation, but we can build more advanced security features atop it.

We started CoreOS with a mission to secure the internet. This is an intentionally audacious goal, but it is unquestionably necessary, as demonstrated by exploits threatening privacy, commerce, and government. It is also achievable.

summit 2016

Today we are announcing additional speakers, sponsors, and the first look at the second annunal Tectonic Summit's agenda.

Note: The instructions in this post are out of date. To try out the Prometheus Operator, view the latest Prometheus docs for an up-to-date guide to get started.

Today, CoreOS introduced a new class of software in the Kubernetes community called an Operator. An Operator builds upon the basic Kubernetes resource and controller concepts but includes application domain knowledge to take care of common tasks. They reduce the complexity of running distributed systems and help you focus on the desired configuration, not the details of manual deployment and lifecycle management.

A Site Reliability Engineer (SRE) is a person that operates an application by writing software. They are an engineer, a developer, who knows how to develop software specifically for a particular application domain. The resulting piece of software has an application's operational domain knowledge programmed into it.

Our team has been busy in the Kubernetes community designing and implementing this concept to reliably create, configure, and manage complex application instances atop Kubernetes.

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