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All posts tagged “Kubernetes”

Tectonic 1.8 logo image

Today we're proud to announce Tectonic 1.8, the latest release of our enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, is now available. This version, which we announced ahead of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America earlier this month, is the first to ship with a catalog of industry-first Open Cloud Services that enable users to deploy key infrastructure components with the ease of managed cloud vendor offerings but without cloud vendor lock-in.

Illustration: CoreOS and Kubernetes

 

Kubernetes is the highest velocity cloud-related open source project, and its pace of development isn't slowing down. This week the project will ship Kubernetes 1.9, its latest release, coming three months after Kubernetes 1.8. The new version includes a number of updates, fixes, and new features, as you can see in the release notes. Many of these changes are "under the hood," however – so rather than diving into a feature checklist here, it's worth looking at the overarching goals driving the next phase of Kubernetes development.

CoreOS recognized early on that orchestration would be the catalyst to launch containerized infrastructure into the mainstream. It's a tribute to the entire Kubernetes community that large enterprises already have Kubernetes clusters in production, and the roster keeps growing. So what do we see in the Kubernetes ecosystem's future as 2017 draws to a close? The CoreOS crystal ball reveals a few likely directions for the New Year.
CoreOS Tectonic is Certified Kubernetes

 

Today CoreOS is pleased to announce that CoreOS Tectonic, our enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, has passed the software conformance tests administered by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to become one of the first fully Certified Kubernetes offerings on the market.

Kubernetes makes management of complex environments easy, but to ensure availability it's crucial to have operational insight into the Kubernetes components and all applications running on the cluster. At CoreOS, we believe monitoring is the backbone of a good production environment, which is why we are investing in development of the Prometheus monitoring system. A project hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Prometheus has rapidly gained popularity for infrastructure and application monitoring alike, and today it's taking its next step forward.

At CoreOS, we recognized early on that Kubernetes would become the go-to technology for managing containerized infrastructure in production. The project's openness has allowed it to be embraced by a veritable who's-who of technology vendors, integrators, and consumers. In fact, Kubernetes is now one of the fastest-growing projects in the history of open source. Yet while it may be tempting to assume that getting up and running with Kubernetes is as simple as downloading the code and deploying a cluster, the truth is that going this route can be easier said than done.

The container ecosystem is constantly shifting. Open source tools spring up, new startups enter, and major releases of foundational projects introduce new technologies and concepts. Every month there seems to be a new acronym, and to anyone not deeply involved in the ecosystem it can be overwhelming to keep track of how even the most basic of container concepts relate to each other. So we’ve created a document to help others better understand how the major standards and components in the container ecosystem fit together.

Pluggability is part of the success story of Kubernetes, and as a community we have ensured that many layers – including storage, networking, and schedulers – can be replaced and improved without changing the Kubernetes user experience. Earlier this year, the Kubernetes project created an API called the Container Runtime Interface (CRI) to make the way a container is run on Kubernetes pluggable.

Tectonic 1.7.5 has arrived, and this release is all about monitoring. Container-based infrastructure is highly dynamic, which is great for agility, but enterprise-ready Kubernetes means having the right tools in place to monitor your clusters and respond quickly when problems arise. That's what Tectonic delivers.

With the release of Kubernetes 1.8, role-based access control (RBAC) has been promoted from beta to general availability. CoreOS, through our participation in the Kubernetes SIG Auth group, played a significant role in getting RBAC implemented in upstream Kubernetes. With its graduation to general availability, the feature and its core APIs can be considered stable.

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