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All posts tagged “Kubernetes”

Kubectl is a familiar tool if you use Kubernetes, and it has a broad functionality that takes time to master; it can be a more powerful tool than many people expect. Great resources exist for working with the kubectl command line interface. This is a collection of tips and tricks that will allow you to expand your ability to work with kubectl. Be sure to take a look at the cheat sheet in the kubernetes.io docs section as well!

At the end of March we saw Kubernetes 1.6, the first release led by a non-Google employee (CoreOS’ own Dan Gillespie), released in upstream. Today we announce the release of CoreOS Tectonic 1.6.2.

The primary focus of this release, in addition to delivering the most current, upstream version of Kubernetes to Tectonic users, is to turn on a number of features that deliver enterprise Kubernetes.

The major updates that make up Tectonic 1.6.2 include:

While Kubernetes is ushering in a world where SSH is less necessary on a daily basis for deploying and managing applications, there are still instances when SSH is necessary for gathering statistics, debugging issues, and repairing configuration issues. So, while years from now there may not be a need to SSH and run one-off debugging sessions, the tools below are useful for quickly SSH'ing into machines in your Kubernetes cluster.

Bringing AWS Application Load Balancer support to Kubernetes with Ticketmaster

Teams running Kubernetes have long desired more than the "out of the box" cloud provider integration for load balancers. This is especially true on AWS, where provisioning a Classic Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) per service might not cut it (financially and functionally).

It’s easy to forget how new Kubernetes and containers are. Those of us who’ve already embraced them should remember we’re on the frontier. If you’re a regular reader of the CoreOS blog, you’re likely with us on that bleeding edge.

This post will be a little different than our usual. Its goal is to introduce Kubernetes to folks who aren’t on the frontier. That might be those in tech who work on the business side, or developers who have yet to make the leap into containers. To tell the tale, we’ll get a little help from everyone’s favorite frozen treat—ice cream.

Last November at CloudNativeCon, we introduced the Operators pattern. It’s a way to extend Kubernetes’ self-healing features to the complex world of stateful apps.

Kubernetes 1.6 has just been released, and I am incredibly proud to have served as its release lead. Thank you to Caleb Miles (CoreOS) and the rest of my team members from Microsoft, Red Hat, Heptio, Mirantis and Google for all of your hard work and support, as well as the hundreds of community members that participated in this release.

When we started Quay, we wanted to build an image registry that not only allowed you to manage your container images, but do so securely and reliably. Over the past few months we have noticed an accelerated interest in Quay and containers in general. One of the main forces driving this growth is the adoption of container orchestration and in particular, Kubernetes. And with the introduction of a new platform came a new set of challenges around deploying ever increasingly complex applications.

An admission plugin security vulnerability related to PodSecurityPolicies was patched with the release of Kubernetes v1.5.5. This vulnerability could allow users to make use of any PodSecurityPolicies object, including those they are not authorized to use.

Am I affected by this vulnerability?

This vulnerability only affects Kubernetes v1.5.0-1.5.4 and, more specifically, installations that do all of the following:

In 2014 Google packaged their experience building massive and automated container clusters into a remarkable system of open source software known by a Greek word for “helmsman”: Kubernetes. Successor to the internal Borg system and its research-oriented successor, Omega, the introduction of Kubernetes garnered massive interest. The open source project quickly took on new developers outside Google.

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