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All posts tagged “Kubernetes”

Last November at CloudNativeCon, we introduced the Operators pattern. It’s a way to extend Kubernetes’ self-healing features to the complex world of stateful apps.

Kubernetes 1.6 has just been released, and I am incredibly proud to have served as its release lead. Thank you to Caleb Miles (CoreOS) and the rest of my team members from Microsoft, Red Hat, Heptio, Mirantis and Google for all of your hard work and support, as well as the hundreds of community members that participated in this release.

When we started Quay, we wanted to build an image registry that not only allowed you to manage your container images, but do so securely and reliably. Over the past few months we have noticed an accelerated interest in Quay and containers in general. One of the main forces driving this growth is the adoption of container orchestration and in particular, Kubernetes. And with the introduction of a new platform came a new set of challenges around deploying ever increasingly complex applications.

An admission plugin security vulnerability related to PodSecurityPolicies was patched with the release of Kubernetes v1.5.5. This vulnerability could allow users to make use of any PodSecurityPolicies object, including those they are not authorized to use.

Am I affected by this vulnerability?

This vulnerability only affects Kubernetes v1.5.0-1.5.4 and, more specifically, installations that do all of the following:

In 2014 Google packaged their experience building massive and automated container clusters into a remarkable system of open source software known by a Greek word for “helmsman”: Kubernetes. Successor to the internal Borg system and its research-oriented successor, Omega, the introduction of Kubernetes garnered massive interest. The open source project quickly took on new developers outside Google.

The 2017 Open Source Leadership Summit, put on by the Linux Foundation, brought together leaders from the open source community in Lake Tahoe last week to discuss timely open source topics. The topics that came up most throughout the conference included: open source becoming mainstream, future open source business models, security in a time where everything is connected, and a call to action to be active in technology policy.

Over the past two years, we’ve seen a shift in the way organizations think about and manage distributed applications. At CoreOS, work toward this shift began with fleet, a simple distributed service manager released in 2014. Today, the community is seeing widespread adoption of Kubernetes, a system with origins at Google that is becoming the de facto standard for open source container orchestration.

The Kubernetes community released its 1.5 version on December 12 and just about a business month later (which included the holiday season), we are proud to release Tectonic 1.5. Tectonic includes self-driving container infrastructure and ships with the latest Kubernetes version, 1.5.2.

2017 is the year Kubernetes becomes the backbone of distributed systems. In 2016, the Kubernetes community greatly expanded as more people understood the potential of container orchestration.

Premiered at Tectonic Summit 2016, learn more about how the industry is viewing the future of Kubernetes.

At Tectonic Summit on Monday, we discussed the core premise of CoreOS: securing the internet and applying operational knowledge into software. We shared how CoreOS makes infrastructure run well and update itself automatically, from Container Linux by CoreOS, to CoreOS Tectonic – what we refer to as self-driving infrastructure.

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