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All posts tagged “Kubernetes”

Over the past two years, we’ve seen a shift in the way organizations think about and manage distributed applications. At CoreOS, work toward this shift began with fleet, a simple distributed service manager released in 2014. Today, the community is seeing widespread adoption of Kubernetes, a system with origins at Google that is becoming the de facto standard for open source container orchestration.

The Kubernetes community released its 1.5 version on December 12 and just about a business month later (which included the holiday season), we are proud to release Tectonic 1.5. Tectonic includes self-driving container infrastructure and ships with the latest Kubernetes version, 1.5.2.

2017 is the year Kubernetes becomes the backbone of distributed systems. In 2016, the Kubernetes community greatly expanded as more people understood the potential of container orchestration.

Premiered at Tectonic Summit 2016, learn more about how the industry is viewing the future of Kubernetes.

At Tectonic Summit on Monday, we discussed the core premise of CoreOS: securing the internet and applying operational knowledge into software. We shared how CoreOS makes infrastructure run well and update itself automatically, from Container Linux by CoreOS, to CoreOS Tectonic – what we refer to as self-driving infrastructure.

At CoreOS, we are focused on translating years of engineering experience and knowledge into software for automation, security and simplicity. The path starts with containers and is even more important across distributed systems – the orchestration of the cluster with Kubernetes – to make infrastructure easier to manage while teams can focus on their applications. With CoreOS Tectonic 1.4.5, the latest release of the enterprise Kubernetes solution, we have advanced some of this work of our AWS installer to make it easier to manage Kubernetes and AWS.

The CoreOS team has been an active participant in the Kubernetes project since Google began the process of open-sourcing this successor to their internal Borg and Omega systems. We not only believe Kubernetes is the right architecture for modern application infrastructure, we see it as an agent of transformation for IT organizations. We coined the acronym GIFEE – “Google Infrastructure for Everyone” – to help summarize what Kubernetes means for businesses.

During OpenStack Summit Austin, we partnered with Intel in an initiative aiming to automate and orchestrate the deployment and management of OpenStack with Kubernetes. Today, we are pleased to announce a technical preview of the project affectionately called "Stackanetes", available with the latest OpenStack release, "Newton". This tech preview of OpenStack on Kubernetes provides high availability with simple scaling and control plane self-healing, virtual machine live migration, and the full complement of OpenStack IaaS features – deployed, managed, and scaled with Kubernetes automation.

A critical security bug has been found and fixed in Kubernetes TLS client authentication. This vulnerability affects Kubernetes v1.4.2 and older, and has been fixed in Kubernetes v1.4.3 and higher.

Identifying Affected Systems

To determine if a Kubernetes cluster is currently running a vulnerable version, run:

CoreOS Tectonic enables everyone to operate their server systems like Google does; we call this GIFEE (Google’s Infrastructure For Everyone). Built on Kubernetes, the production-grade container orchestration system, Tectonic enables you to manage complex containerized application infrastructure from application source code to live load balancer.

One of our missions here at CoreOS is to help secure the internet by allowing organizations of all sizes to deploy secure and scalable infrastructure in the same way internet giants such as Google, Twitter, and Facebook do. In short we are striving to make GIFEE a reality by working with the community that is developing Kubernetes. Today we are giving a preview of two Kubernetes 1.4 features we implemented upstream with the wider Kubernetes community.

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