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All posts tagged “containers”
CoreOS recognized early on that orchestration would be the catalyst to launch containerized infrastructure into the mainstream. It's a tribute to the entire Kubernetes community that large enterprises already have Kubernetes clusters in production, and the roster keeps growing. So what do we see in the Kubernetes ecosystem's future as 2017 draws to a close? The CoreOS crystal ball reveals a few likely directions for the New Year.

CoreOS was founded with the mission of securing the internet, and containerized infrastructure is a big part of how we’re achieving that aim. That’s why we were gratified to see the new guidance on application container security issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In many ways, the report affirms the core principles upon which CoreOS was founded.

The container ecosystem is constantly shifting. Open source tools spring up, new startups enter, and major releases of foundational projects introduce new technologies and concepts. Every month there seems to be a new acronym, and to anyone not deeply involved in the ecosystem it can be overwhelming to keep track of how even the most basic of container concepts relate to each other. So we’ve created a document to help others better understand how the major standards and components in the container ecosystem fit together.

Pluggability is part of the success story of Kubernetes, and as a community we have ensured that many layers – including storage, networking, and schedulers – can be replaced and improved without changing the Kubernetes user experience. Earlier this year, the Kubernetes project created an API called the Container Runtime Interface (CRI) to make the way a container is run on Kubernetes pluggable.

Recently, we released a study conducted by technology research and advisory company 451 Research investigating containers adoption by enterprises across a range of industries. The study included responses from over 200 enterprise IT decision makers, mostly from large enterprises within the US, including CTO’s, VP’s, and directors of IT, IT Ops and DevOps.

At Tectonic Summit on Monday, we discussed the core premise of CoreOS: securing the internet and applying operational knowledge into software. We shared how CoreOS makes infrastructure run well and update itself automatically, from Container Linux by CoreOS, to CoreOS Tectonic – what we refer to as self-driving infrastructure.

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