Enterprise Kubernetes, delivered

Tectonic ships with CoreOS's signature automated operations, runs multi-cloud, and is the fastest, most secure path to Kubernetes.

Tectonic Services

Tectonic Services are the applications that are installed into your cluster. These include:

Name Description
Tectonic Console Web management console for Kubernetes and the services themselves
Tectonic Identity Centralized user management for services on your cluster
Tectonic Support Service for the Tectonic Support team to help understand what is happening in your cluster

Optional Additional Services

Name Description
Quay Enterprise The award-winning Docker Registry, based on Quay.io
CoreUpdate Manage upgrades of your CoreOS hosts and your applications

Installing with kubectl

All Tectonic Services run on Kubernetes and are installed with kubectl. We'll use it to install all of the included services, then configure your Tectonic license, and finally configure the Tectonic Console so your users can access it.

If you didn't configure kubectl during cluster installation, follow this guide.

Install Services

Before installing services, make sure you created the tectonic-system namespace from the second step of the deployer guide.

Download the Tectonic Services template and submit it to the cluster:

$ kubectl create -f tectonic-services.yml
replicationcontrollers/tectonic-manager

The Tectonic Services are run within a separate namespace, tectonic-system, in order to group them together and keep them out of your way. You're encouraged to use namespaces for your company's teams, projects or deployment environments.

Install your Tectonic License

Next, we need to install your license in order to complete the installation of the Tectonic Services. You can find your pull secret on the main screen after logging in to your Tectonic account, under "Account Assets". There are several formats of the license, be sure to download the Kubernetes-formatted file. This single license is used for all of your Tectonic products.

The license is stored within the cluster as a Secret, which is a secure way to expose sensitive data to applications in Kubernetes. Your Tectonic License should be pre-formatted as a Secret and should look similar to:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: tectonic-license
  namespace: tectonic-system
type: Opaque
data:
  license: 5SiztAC4BPJo28fhFUy6hjYSQBbyW7Sn2sQg4P7xPA...

Once you've obtained your license, place it in a file called tectonic-license.yml (template) on your local machine.

Now all we need to do is submit the Secret into the cluster:

$ kubectl create -f tectonic-license.yml --namespace=tectonic-system
secrets/tectonic-license

Install your Tectonic Pull Secret

Kubernetes supports a special type of secret, called a Pull Secret, that is used for pulling containers from a private Docker registry. Tectonic uses this to pull down the containers that run the Tectonic Services.

You can find a pre-generated Pull Secret in your Tectonic account, under "Account Assets". There are several formats of the secret, be sure to download the Kubernetes-formatted file. It should looks similar to:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: coreos-pull-secret
type: kubernetes.io/dockercfg
data:
  .dockercfg: OVXRFVkVSUyIsCiAgImVtYWlsIjogIiIKIH0KfQ...

Once you've obtained your pull secret, place it in a file called coreos-pull-secret.yml (example template) on your local machine.

Now, like before we submit the Secret into the cluster:

$ kubectl create -f coreos-pull-secret.yml --namespace=tectonic-system
secrets/coreos-pull-secret

Check Your Work

With the license and pull secret in place, the Tectonic Services will be downloaded and configured. This process can take a few minutes to complete.

You can check if the Tectonic Services were correctly deployed by running:

$ kubectl --namespace=tectonic-system get pods
NAME                             READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
tectonic-console-y84qu           1/1       Running   0          5s
tectonic-manager-a7d9a           1/1       Running   0          7s
tectonic-support-nbyxs           1/1       Running   0          4s

Once the pods reach Running status, everything should be configured properly.

Exposing Tectonic Services to Web Browsers

By default, the Tectonic Services are not exposed outside of the cluster. For example, we observed the pod running the Tectonic Console, but we don't have a convenient way to access the Console user interface. To allow external access, we create Kubernetes services that expose the Console, as well as the Identity service on which it depends. This step requires careful consideration because services are exposed on the open network.

There are two main ways of configuring a service to expose it outside of the cluster: the NodePort and the LoadBalancer.

Using a NodePort

The NodePort facility exposes a Kubernetes service on a given port number on every node in a cluster. Exposed as a NodePort, the Tectonic Console can be accessed by pointing a browser at that port on any node. Exposing a service on a NodePort allows all nodes to function as backends for a load balancer maintaining the service's availability.

This Kubernetes service definition exposes Tectonic Identity on NodePort 30556:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: tectonic-identity
  namespace: tectonic-system
  labels:
    tectonic-app: identity
spec:
  selector:
    tectonic-app: identity
    tectonic-component: worker
  type: NodePort
  ports:
  - protocol: TCP
    port: 5556
    nodePort: 30556

This similar definition exposes the Tectonic Console on every node's port 32000:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: tectonic-console-public
  namespace: tectonic-system
spec:
  type: NodePort
  ports:
    - port: 80
      nodePort: 32000
      protocol: TCP
      name: tectonic-console-expose
  selector:
    tectonic-app: console
    tectonic-component: ui

First, download the YAML file defining the Identity service. This file becomes input to the kubectl command in the shell lines below. Note the argument specifying the tectonic-system namespace. kubectl output will include information about exposing the service to the network.

$ kubectl --namespace=tectonic-system create -f tectonic-identity-service.yml
You have exposed your service on an external port on all nodes in your
cluster.  If you want to expose this service to the external internet, you may
need to set up firewall rules for the service port(s) (tcp:30556) to serve traffic.

See http://releases.k8s.io/HEAD/docs/user-guide/services-firewalls.md for more details.
services/tectonic-identity-public

Next, download the Console service definition file and feed it to kubectl to create the Console service in the same fashion:

$ kubectl --namespace=tectonic-system create -f tectonic-console-service.yml
You have exposed your service on an external port on all nodes in your
cluster.  If you want to expose this service to the external internet, you may
need to set up firewall rules for the service port(s) (tcp:32000) to serve traffic.
[...]
services/tectonic-console-public

You should now be able to browse to https://<node>:32000, where node is the hostname or IP address of any cluster node.

Using a LoadBalancer

If you are using a Kubernetes deployment on Google or AWS and have configured your cloud credentials as a Secret, using the service type "LoadBalancer" will create a new cloud load balancer and expose the service through it. Example (template):

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: tectonic-console-cloud
  namespace: tectonic-system
spec:
  type: LoadBalancer
  ports:
    - port: 80
      protocol: TCP
      name: tectonic-console-expose
  selector:
    tectonic-app: console
    tectonic-component: ui
$ kubectl --namespace=tectonic-system create -f https://tectonic.com/docs/latest/deployer/files/tectonic-console-cloud.yml
services/tectonic-console-cloud

If you haven't configured your cloud credentials, the service will still be created, but the cloud load balancer won't be created.